Archive for » September 21st, 2003«

whew

What a weekend! I spent most of the time working on homework. Ah, literature class. My nemesis.
Tomorrow’s my last day as a buyer’s assistant. Go me!
Anyway, I have my SMLSOTW ready to go.
CRANBERRIES
“Zombie” (No Need To Argue)

Another head hangs lowly,
Child is slowly taken.
And the violence caused such silence,
Who are we mistaken?
But you see, it’s not me, it’s not my family.
In your head, in your head they are fighting,
With their tanks and their bombs,
And their bombs and their guns.
In your head, in your head, they are crying…
In your head, in your head,
Zombie, zombie, zombie,
Hey, hey, hey. What’s in your head,
In your head,
Zombie, zombie, zombie?
Hey, hey, hey, hey, oh, dou, dou, dou, dou, dou…
Another mother’s breakin’,
Heart is taking over.
When the vi’lence causes silence,
We must be mistaken.
It’s the same old theme since nineteen-sixteen.
In your head, in your head they’re still fighting,
With their tanks and their bombs,
And their bombs and their guns.
In your head, in your head, they are dying…
In your head, in your head,
Zombie, zombie, zombie,
Hey, hey, hey. What’s in your head,
In your head,
Zombie, zombie, zombie?
Hey, hey, hey, hey, oh, oh, oh,
Oh, oh, oh, oh, hey, oh, ya, ya-a…

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Wordsworth – pioneer?

Hey, I finished my Wordsworth paper. Took most of the weekend. Damn him and my lit teacher! I’m not much of a poetry person. I like to read it, but I hate to analyze or write it. But anyway, here’s the paper if anyone’s interested. I think it’s actually one of my better ones.

(bad formatting import from my old blog – i haven’t gone through to fix it yet.)

A New Type of Poetry for the Common Man copyright 2003 misspriss.org NO STEALING In a collection of poems entitled Lyrical Ballads, William Wordsworth creates a new, more commonly accessible genre of poetry. He explains his ideas and intent in his �Preface to Lyrical Ballads.� Readers can see his ideas implemented in �Lines (Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey).� When the reader comes across the phrase �unripe fruits, [a]re clad in one green hue� (Lines, 235, ln 12-3), one might think Wordsworth is caught breaking one of his rules. Wordsworth states �personifications of abstract ideas rarely occur� (Preface, 244). He does not, however, exclude natural objects, such as trees or �orchard-tufts� (Lines, 235, ln 11), from use in such a common poetical tool. Wordsworth stays within the confines of his new poetry. The image of small farmhouses with grass and pastures evokes an image of communing with nature. Picture a secluded area of �pastoral farms, [g]reen to the very door� (Lines, 235, ln 16-7) � it evokes calmness and simplicity. Even the Hermit takes the reader to a simple place, as Wordsworth intends. Wordsworth planned to write of a �low and rustic life� and a �state of greater simplicity� (Preface, 241). Once again he takes readers precisely where he plans to lead them. Wordsworth�s choice of words creates a sense of calmness and relaxation. When he writes of a �serene and blessed mood� (Lines, 236, ln 41), he suggests a place of solitude and retreat when city life gets hectic. His feelings about the Wye give importance to his remembrance of it. The action of remembering, coupled with escape from reality, manages to accomplish another of Wordsworth�s goals: �that the feeling therein developed gives importance to the action and situation� (Preface, 243). Wordsworth proposes to �adopt the very language of men� (Preface, 244). He uses mostly common language, although some of the phrase structures are a bit more poetic than is common in regular speech. For instance �[t]he picture of the mind revives again� (Lines, 236, ln 61), while using clear and simple language, would probably be best said by a common man as �the mind�s picture revives again.� Also �when first I came among these hills� (Lines, 236, ln 66-7) would be �when I first came among these hills.� These slight modifications, though, with just a word or two rearranged, hardly indicate that Wordsworth failed in his endeavors. Readers may, however, take Wordsworth to task for naming his collection of poems Lyrical Ballads. While he may have meant to encompass the entirety of this volume, �Lines (Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey)� does not fall under the umbrella of both a lyric and a ballad. While �Lines� could be called a lyric, it is certainly not a ballad. A lyric is a short, non-narrative poem (Abrams). Its speaker expresses a process of thought and feeling. �Lines� includes those exact characteristics. However, �Lines� does not qualify as a ballad. It is not a song, nor is it impersonal. In fact, �Lines� is quite personal for Wordsworth. He relates his thoughts about the Wye and how oft he remembers the tranquility of its banks (Lines, 236, ln 50-7). While he addresses the last stanza to his sister, Wordsworth does not insert dialogue into the poem, as a ballad requires (Abrams). This poem deals with thoughts and feelings � not action. In spite of the ambiguity of the title Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth manages to produce a more readable and understandable breed of poetry. One, in fact, that even the neophyte can enjoy.

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